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Compressed sensing (CS) MP2RAGE versus standard MPRAGE: A comparison of derived brain volume measurements

  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first author.
    Pilar Maria Ferraro
    Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first author.
    Affiliations
    Neurology Clinic Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first author.
    Lorenzo Gualco
    Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first author.
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
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  • Mauro Costagli
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DiNOGMI), Largo Paolo Daneo 3, 16132 Genova (GE), Italy.
    Affiliations
    Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DiNOGMI), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy

    Laboratory of Medical Physics and Magnetic Resonance, IRCCS Stella Maris, Pisa, Italy
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  • Simona Schiavi
    Affiliations
    Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DiNOGMI), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
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  • Marta Ponzano
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Sciences, Section of Biostatistics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
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  • Alessio Signori
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Sciences, Section of Biostatistics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
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  • Federico Massa
    Affiliations
    Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DiNOGMI), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
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  • Matteo Pardini
    Affiliations
    Neurology Clinic Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy

    Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DiNOGMI), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy
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  • Lucio Castellan
    Affiliations
    Neuroradiology Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy
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  • Fabrizio Levrero
    Affiliations
    Health Physics Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy
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  • Domenico Zacà
    Affiliations
    Siemens Healthcare s.r.l, Milan, Italy
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  • Gian Franco Piredda
    Affiliations
    Advanced Clinical Imaging Technology, Siemens Healthineers International AG, Lausanne, Switzerland

    Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

    École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland
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  • Tom Hilbert
    Affiliations
    Advanced Clinical Imaging Technology, Siemens Healthineers International AG, Lausanne, Switzerland

    Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

    École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland
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  • Tobias Kober
    Affiliations
    Advanced Clinical Imaging Technology, Siemens Healthineers International AG, Lausanne, Switzerland

    Department of Radiology, Lausanne University Hospital and University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

    École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland
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  • Luca Roccatagliata
    Affiliations
    Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL), University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy

    Neuroradiology Unit, IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa, Italy
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first author.
Published:November 08, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmp.2022.10.023

      Abstract

      Purpose

      T1 Magnetization Prepared Two Rapid Acquisition Gradient Echo (MP2RAGE) with compress sensing (CS) has been proposed as an improvement of the standard MPRAGE sequence with multiple advantages including reduced acquisition time needed to provide a quantitative 3D anatomical image coupled with T1-map. Here we investigated the agreement between FreeSurfer-derived volume measurements obtained from MPRAGE and CS MP2RAGE acquisitions.

      Methods

      MPRAGE and CS MP2RAGE images of 37 subjects (14 patients with neurodegenerative disorders and 23 healthy controls) were acquired on a 3 T MR scanner and grey matter volumes were extracted using standard FreeSurfer parcellation. Lin’s concordance correlation coefficient (Lin’s CCC), Bland-Altman analysis, Passing-Bablok regression and DICE similarity coefficient were calculated to assess the agreement between the two.

      Results

      We found a good correspondence for most of the regions examined, with 93.5 % of them showing a mean DICE index >0.70. Poorer results were found with Lin’s CCC especially for subcortical labels across patients. The Bland-Altman analysis showed CS MP2RAGE tended to measure lower cortical volumes compared to MPRAGE but in most cases the difference wasn’t statistically relevant. The Passing-Bablock regression indicated overall an absence of systematic constant and proportional bias when CS MP2RAGE was used instead of MPRAGE.

      Conclusions

      We found a good concordance for volumes obtained from MPRAGE and CS MP2RAGE images using FreeSurfer, suggesting a possible role of CS MP2RAGE for structural analysis with significant advantages like shorter acquisition time and the possibility to simultaneously obtain quantitative T1-maps of the brain enriching the diagnostic power of this technique.

      Keywords

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